From our blog, articles tagged: Alcohol

As a parent, you want the absolute best for your children. You spend quite a bit of time teaching them how to make decisions that will benefit them now and down the road as an adult.

When it comes to drinking, you certainly want to educate your children about alcohol and encourage them to steer clear from the substance.

At the very least, you don’t want your children to try drinking at a young age. Maybe you can be on board if they want to have a social drink when they are adults, but as teenagers, you may be inclined to believe that they are not old enough to handle the responsibility.

As such, just how do you set strong boundaries with children about drinking? What if you and/or your spouse drink? Does this make a difference in what you should expect from your children? Will teens be more apt to rebel or sneak off and drink if you set strong boundaries?

These are all great questions. Today, let’s discuss a bit about setting strong boundaries when it comes to alcohol and your children.

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When you give up drinking it can seem like all of the fun things you used to do go with it. Most of our social lives revolve around alcohol, which not only is unhealthy but can lead to the slippery slope of addiction.

Choosing to live alcohol-free may seem like a daunting task, but all you need to do is find things that can replace drinking.

 

Why You Can Still Have Fun and Be Sober

While it can feel lonely being one of the only of your friends that is sober, it’s more likely than not that someone around is going through the same situation as you. Almost one-third of adult Americans don’t drink at all and another third have less than one alcoholic drink a week. People who don’t drink have reported several benefits like better skin, more focus, and a deeper connection with themselves and those around them.

Just because you’re sober doesn’t mean that you can’t have a little fun. There are plenty of ways for you to have a great time alcohol-free. Don’t believe us? We’ve put together a list of 30 things you can do instead of drinking. An entire month’s worth of activities that you can do without alcohol, with friends, or by yourself. The next time you’re tempted to pick up a drink or just can’t think of anything fun to do sober, check out these 30 options you have to choose from.

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When Fall comes around, so does sports season and the tradition of tailgating.

When most people think of tailgating they think of alcohol. 82 percent of tailgaters reported having two or more drinks at the big game. Whether it’s chugging a keg or making cocktails, there’s no doubting that alcohol is an integral part of the tailgating tradition. But that doesn’t mean that tailgating can’t be enjoyed just as much when you’re sober.

Sober Tailgating is Easy and Fun!

Sober tailgating may be a new phenomenon for most people, but it’s one that allows you to enjoy the spirit of the game and the festivities without a drink in hand. Below are ten amazing tips for a great sober tailgate. Whether you’re hosting the tailgate yourself or you’re a guest at someone else’s, remember that alcohol isn’t necessary to enjoy the company of your friends and a great ball game. With these tips, staying sober at tailgate is easier than ever.

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Whether you're a college or professional football fan, you probably start getting very excited for football season well in advance of kick off day.

College students and adults alike anticipate the first game of each football season with an eager expectation for some good, competitive football.

But if you're in recovery, you may have mixed feelings about the upcoming football season. If this is your first football season where your intention is to stay sober and clean, you may have some reservations. After all, you've probably spent a good deal of time at tailgate parties and hanging out with the buddies having some brewskies while watching the game. To think about not drinking at all during the football season may bring on some anxiety and may even cause you to feel a bit sad. 

Rest assured that it is possible to stay sober during the football season. It may require some planning and some sort of support network, but you can continue your recovery and have an excellent time watching all of the games. 

Today let's look at how you can tackle the upcoming football season while in recovery.

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The Research Society on Alcoholism has recently found evidence that alcohol causes cells to age at an expedited rate. Specifically, they found that individuals with alcohol use disorder has shortened telomere lengths in their cells. This suggests that the more alcohol individuals consume, the more at risk they are for age-related ailments such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, dementia, and others.

If you are struggling with alcohol use, please call us today at 504-510-2331.

To learn more, click here: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/06/170626105322.htm

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Staying drug- and alcohol-free is a life-long journey. If you have a friend or family member going through addiction recovery and are looking for ideas on how to show your support, consider the following:

Learn About Addiction

An important first step in supporting a friend or family member going through addiction recovery is to understand addiction. Read about addiction recovery from trusted authorities. Those who become familiar with the problems of addiction gain a better understanding of their loved ones. You can follow our Dream Journal blog for biweekly articles on addiction treatment.

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A new study conducted by the Society of Nuclear Medicine revealed that the brain receptors involved with the impulse to drink reduce their bioavailability during periods of alcohol-dependency. This finding suggests that clinicians can use receptor bioavailability during sobriety to predict long-term success.

If you are struggling with alcohol use disorder, please call us today at 708-613-4750.

Learn more here: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/06/170612094112.htm

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Researchers in the UK recently published the findings of a 30 year longitudinal investigation of moderate alcohol consumption and its effects on brain structure and function. They found that higher alcohol consumption was correlated with hippocampal atrophy, corpus callosum microstructural changes, and a decline in lexical fluency. If you are struggling with alcohol use disorder, please call us today at 708-613-4750.

To learn more, click here: http://www.bmj.com/content/357/bmj.j2353

 

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A study of upper middle class youth suggests that this particular population has a higher than normal frequency of alcohol and drug use when tracked throughout the college years. In addition, researchers found that when parents established repercussions for substance use, the frequency of drunkenness, marijuana, and stimulant use decreased in adulthood.

Adolescent drug and alcohol use should be taken seriously. If you or your child are struggling, please call us today at 708-613-4750.

Read more here: https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/development-and-psychopathology/article/adolescents-from-upper-middle-class-communities-substance-misuse-and-addiction-across-early-adulthood/FDB120DD01CC8CEE7A9FB3979306A57C

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Researchers have recently discovered that fetal alcohol exposure reduces responsiveness to the commonly bitter and burning taste of alcohol. This suggests that individuals exposed to alcohol before birth may find alcohol more appealing than their peers with more responsive gustatory systems.

To read more, click here: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/05/170518134956.htm

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Canadian researchers have found that high school students who used alcohol or marijuana were less likely to achieve academic success, as determined by class attendance, assignment completion, grade point average, and motivation. Longitudinal data indicated that those students who stopped using or decreased frequency of use were more likely to pursue higher education.

If you are struggling with alcohol or marijuana use disorder, please call us today at 708-613-4750

Read more here: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/josh.12498/abstract

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Researchers have been examining gut microbiota to figure out how it contributes to human health for a while now.

In fact, gut composition has already been linked to various health conditions, such as depression, allergies, obesity, and inflammatory bowel diseases.

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New research has shown that alcoholism may affect women differently than men. Specifically, the affected reward system brain structures are larger in alcoholic women which has been correlated with a shorter length of sobriety.

If you are a loved one are struggling with alcohol use disorder, call us today at 708-613-4750 and read more about the effects of gender on alcoholism here: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/04/170420162145.htm

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When a relative is struggling with addiction, everyone in the family can be affected; this is why we say addiction is a family disease.

The person addicted to drugs often develops financial, emotional, or psychological problems and becomes unreliable, causing others to have to fill in for and perform their responsibilities. This increases the stress of all people involved and can cause resentment and distrust.

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Alcohol abuse has been linked to unsafe sexual behavior and is associated with increased risk of HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted infections. Intoxication often leads to poor decision-making and a lack of inhibition, making sexual behavior a common issue.

Unsafe behaviors such as anonymous sex, failure to use condoms and/or birth control, and engaging with multiple sexual partners all increase the risk of adverse health outcomes. Additionally, patterns of alcohol abuse are associated with sexual risk-taking behaviors in the long-term, not only following binge-drinking events.

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A new study suggests that even though individuals with a family history of alcoholism are no more likely to develop hangover symptoms than their counterparts, they are more likely to lucidly recall their unpleasant symptoms. This suggests a possible clinical application, reminding drinkers of the negative side-effects they experienced in an attempt to lessen excessive drinking episodes.

If you or a loved one are struggling with alcohol use, please call us today at 708-613-4750.

Read more here: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/03/170320143111.htm

 

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Exercise is an important part of living a healthy life for everyone, but it is especially important for individuals in recovery.

In a study examining the exercise behaviors of individuals in an outpatient addiction treatment program, however, only 29% were actually working out. The most common reasons cited for this low number were lack of time, difficulties with transportation, and lack of money. Most of the patients were interested in exercising but noted that they lacked the motivation to work through their perceived barriers. We’ve provided a list of motivational reasons to exercise below, and we hope it helps to change your physical fitness routine for the better!

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A recent study published in Addiction journal indicates that having a substance use disorder significantly increases the risk of suicide in veterans, twice the risk for men and up to five times the risk for women. These findings suggest that a more robust suicide prevention plan should be implemented in veterans struggling with drug use. If you or a loved one are struggling with drug use of any kind, please call us today at 504-510-2331.

 

Read more here: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/03/170316092949.htm

 

 

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Energy drinks are a popular choice for influential adolescents; in fact, the CDC reports that 34% of all 18-24 year olds consume this type of beverage.

This poses an issue because this is an age at which alcohol often becomes an issue, and when energy drinks and alcohol are mixed together there is a three-fold increase in the risk of excessive binge drinking. This combination can cause serious health problems and may have long-term consequences for the drinker.

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TV, alcohol, and kids just don’t mix. The average American youth spends 1200 hours per year watching television. This total of 1200 hours is the equivalent of spending 50 days a year watching TV.

In the 50 days a year that our kids are consumed by the television, beer and spirit advertisers are increasing the amount of money spent on ads to sell their products to impressionable viewers. In 2010, beer and alcoholic spirits companies spent over 1 billion dollars on TV ads. The mix of alcohol ads with young people watching is leading to a dangerous and deadly trend among American youth.

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Light regulates circadian rhythms

Why and How We Live Rhythmically at Two Dreams

The chains of habit are generally too small to be felt until they are too strong to be broken

- Samuel Johnson

Every living organism has a natural rhythm. These rhythms are disrupted by illness, particularly drug and alcohol use. A drug can create false sleep. A drug can stimulate alertness. A drug can suppress appetite. Another can stimulate appetite.

The science behind living rhythmically, strategies that promote and restore natural rhythms, and the role of sleep, nutrition, meditation, and exercise in the 21st century approach to healing oneself in recovery are all important aspects of your journey at Two Dreams.

At Two Dreams the concept of living in the NOW (No Other Way) is central to living a life in recovery. Similarly, mindfulness is a state of active, open, non-judgmental attention on the present. Many treatment programs and practitioners are employing mindfulness in the care and management of patients with mood, anxiety, and substance use disorders- diseases and symptoms which tend to cluster together.

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