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Binders for education

Two Dreams encourages everyone to utilize the many alcohol education resources available online and in your local libraries and bookstores.

The following is a compilation of alcohol education resources that we find to be particularly useful and informative:


Adult Children of Alcoholics World Service Organization, Inc.

This organization caters to adults who were raised in dysfunctional environments and who exhibit traits characteristic to survivors of past abuse and/or neglect. The group implements the 12-step model, one of the most well-known and celebrated methods of recovery support in the world, and emphasizes the importance of emotional healing through meeting attendance, sponsorship, and intensive self-reflection.

Al-Anon/Alateen Family Group

These support systems are meant to encourage fellowship between the friends and families of alcoholics. Regular meetings give members a chance to heal through sharing common experiences and instilling hope and strength in one another. Affiliates utilize the 12-step model, taking less

Alcoholics Anonymous (AA)

AA is a support group based on honest self-evaluation and the affirmation of certain virtuous principles. Members follow the 12-step program and attend regular meetings to keep each other accountable. They serve as a source of continuing encouragement for each other, and reference “The Big Book” and other materials that teach about the disease of addiction.

American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM)

ASAM is a professional society for addiction medicine specialists. The group strives to improve the quality of care provided to individuals struggling with substance use disorders. Members are dedicated to increasing access to treatment and providing alcohol and drug-related education resources to the general public. They are also well known for their research and prevention initiatives. The CEO of Two Dreams, Dr. Andrea Barthwell, is a former president of this impressive organization.

Centers for Disease Control (CDC)

The CDC provides valuable information and research on alcoholism as it relates to public health, along with other topics of interest. The CDC Alcohol Program is part of the Division of Population Health in the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health promotion. It works to improve public health outcomes related to excessive alcohol use through the use of scientific research and methodology. The program particularly focuses on the study of underage and binge drinking, as well as the epidemiology of alcoholism and the promotion of leadership in the field of addiction.

Faces & Voices of Recovery

This activist organization advocates for the millions of Americans recovering from addiction to alcohol and other drugs. The group promotes the right to treatment resources and education while holding events to combat the stigma of active addiction. Individuals who have experienced addiction in some form or another are welcome to share their recovery stories on the website and become a permanent installation in the gallery of faces and voices of recovery.

National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA)

The NIAAA is a sect of the National Institute of Health (NIH) entirely devoted to alcohol addiction and misuse. The organization shares self-help strategies, practical tips for recovery, relevant statistics and research results, and more. They also host an annual “National Drug and Alcohol Facts Week” and hold conferences to further discussion and research throughout the year.

National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)

The NIDA is the leading authority on drug abuse and addiction in the United States of America. They conduct research on, and respond to, emerging drug trends, addiction pathology, treatment and prevention approaches, and more. They provide support for career development, public health awareness, research training and dissemination efforts, and collaboration between research institutes around the globe. Professionals in the field of addiction medicine, including ours at Two Dreams, use the NIDA’s “Principles of Effective Treatment Guide” as a reference to ensure that clients receive the high quality care they deserve.

Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP)

The ONDCP is the branch of the White House that establishes policies related to substance use in the United States of America. Our CEO, Dr. Andrea Barthwell, previously worked as Deputy Director for Demand Reduction at the ONDCP under George W. Bush. The organization provides up-to-date information and statistics on the current state of drug and alcohol use in the USA.

Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)

SAMHSA is an agency dedicated to behavioral health and addiction within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. It spearheads efforts to improve public health outcomes related to substance abuse and mental illness in the United States of America. According to the group, “slightly more than half of Americans aged 12 or older report being current drinkers of alcohol.”

U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM)

The NLM is the largest biomedical library in the world. It contains tens of thousands of pages of alcohol and drug research, serving as a reliable source of educational materials for professionals and for the general public.

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Light regulates circadian rhythms

Why and How We Live Rhythmically at Two Dreams

The chains of habit are generally too small to be felt until they are too strong to be broken

- Samuel Johnson

Every living organism has a natural rhythm. These rhythms are disrupted by illness, particularly drug and alcohol use. A drug can create false sleep. A drug can stimulate alertness. A drug can suppress appetite. Another can stimulate appetite.

The science behind living rhythmically, strategies that promote and restore natural rhythms, and the role of sleep, nutrition, meditation, and exercise in the 21st century approach to healing oneself in recovery are all important aspects of your journey at Two Dreams.

At Two Dreams the concept of living in the NOW (No Other Way) is central to living a life in recovery. Similarly, mindfulness is a state of active, open, non-judgmental attention on the present. Many treatment programs and practitioners are employing mindfulness in the care and management of patients with mood, anxiety, and substance use disorders- diseases and symptoms which tend to cluster together.

Read more ...